4 Simple Tips To Photograph Your Dog Like A Professional

Photographing your dog might seem very simple but every single dog owner knows how difficult it can be. Fortunately, you do not really need to hire a professional. You just need to have patience and learn what to do. If you have a good camera and you want to shoot some great pics of your loved furry friend, here are some tips that will surely make a difference.

Timing Is Very Important

Always take into account the personality of the dog when you want to take pictures of him. You surely know why your dog is unique and are aware of some personality traits that are adorable. Capturing the animal’s natural spirit always creates a great picture. So, make sure you take photographs when you have a high possibility the dog is receptive and will show that unique personality.

The Environment Is Vital

You need to be very careful about the environment if you want to shoot the best pictures. For instance, you cannot expect everyone at the dog park to cooperate if this is the area that you want to focus on. Even worse, you might end up having to look for a personal Injury lawyer Philadelphia if the dog misbehaves or is not comfortable.

It is always best to photograph the dog in an area that is a full comfort zone. When the dog is not nervous or anxious, it is easier to make him cooperate and even smile in pics. Dog owners know how to make their dogs “laugh” but this is not possible in an improper environment. If you want to make your dog comfortable at home, then create a dog-friendly space by installing artificial grass for dogs.

Take Your Time With The Lighting Setup

The best days are the overcast ones if you want to shoot your dog outdoors. This offers even and consistent lighting, with soft shadows. The situation is simply perfect for dogs with darker coats.

Usually, people think the best photos of their dogs are taken in bright sunlight. This is incorrect because the shadowy effect is too harsh. Shoot your pet during late evenings or early mornings for a much warmer glow.

Another thing to remember is that it is usually better not to use your flash. It can scare the dog and often leads to red eyes. When you have to use the flash since there is no natural light available, use off-camera flashes. Alternatively, swivel the light upward in order for it to avoid a direct angle to the pet’s face.

Shoot At Eye-Level

The last important tip we have to highlight is that pictures are so much better when you stoop down and you can look at the dog and make eye contact. If you shoot from a position in which you look down, the shots are distant. They simply do not focus on the subject, which is the pet. If you shoot from the level of the dog, the pictures come from his perspective and not the human perspective. The viewer will surely like the result more. If necessary, just wear some knee pads but do not photograph the dog from above.