Arrived in Fiumicino? The Best Ways to Get From The Airport to Rome

You’ve landed, it’s warm, and you can’t wait to start strolling around Rome. Rome, of course, being one of the most beautiful (and busy) places on the planet.

It is worth noting that Leonardo da Vinci Roma – Fiumicino Airport is the largest and most heavily congested airports in Rome. It has only four terminals, 1,2,3 and uhm 5… Which seems a little strange but there you go.

It serves all major carriers, and the dining and shopping is impressive – you would expect no less from an airport in this location.

After you’ve picked up your luggage, and grabbed a quick coffee – it’s time to head from Rome airport to city center.

It goes without saying you will be more comfortable and relaxed if you opt to take a pre-booked car.

But let’s take a look at some of the best ways to get from the airport to Rome.

Train

The train service is pretty excellent. It is likely going to be your fastest method of getting straight into Rome. The train station can be found at terminal 3. There are two types of train that will be taking you to the center of Rome. Sabina-Fiumicino FR1 or the Leonardo Express.

The Sabina-Fiumicino line FR1 is cheaper, and a one-way ticket can be more convenient. At around 8 Euros, it won’t break that bank and stops at Trastevere, Ostiense, and Tiburtina stations. They are the ones located in some of the most popular places to stay outside of the central city.

These little beauties leave every 15 minutes or every 30 minutes during the holidays. They are also pretty accommodating for early and late flights, with the last one at night leaving at 23.28 and the first one being at 5.58.

What about the Leonardo Express? Well, this is a 31-minute direct shuttle train to Rome’s central train station – Termini. They don’t run as often as the FR1 and are a little more expensive at 14 Euros.

You can get tickets online, or from ticket machines at the entrance to the platforms. They both tend to be pretty busy, so be prepared for a little hustle and bustle.

Bus

If you are partial to the cheap and cheerful, then the coach might be for you. There are 5 bus services offering transport from the airport to Rome. The tickets are a snip at between 4-8 Euros. The journey may take up to 70 minutes though, depending on how often your chosen service stops – and traffic.

Your options are:

Cotral – From Terminal 2, a range of possibilities with tickets available from the newsagents

Tam Bus – Terminal 3, and goes to Termini and Ostiense Stations too, you buy tickets on the bus.

Terravision – 4 Euro, one way, start from Terminal 3 and end up in Termini Station. Book tickets online for this one.

SIT Bus Shuttle – Terminal 3, buy tickets on the bus or online for 8 Euros.

Check the times before booking, and the terminal that they leave from.

Taxi

There are plenty of taxis outside the airport. And while it isn’t a bad option – you might be in for a surprise. Official taxis will be marked with a very visible Comune di Roma. There will be other ‘taxis’ available in the form of unmarked cars, with nicely dressed men. These aren’t official, and might not get you where you want to go via the fastest route.

You should remember that although the taxi services in Rome haven’t always been great, they have been improving over the years and the authorities have been implementing a standard 40 Euro fee from FCO to Rome. But, that is just to the Ancient Walls, anything beyond that becomes metered again.

Pre-booked Car Service

This one makes the most sense in terms of comfort and reliability. A private car service will ensure that you don’t have to fight for a seat like the trains, you won’t be on a hot bus for 70 minutes, and you won’t be ripped off by an unlicensed driver.

Many services will track your flight to make sure that you are never left waiting, you can have a few pieces of luggage and are guaranteed excellent service. A private car will cost a couple more euros than a taxi.

When booking you can look for added extras.

Car services can prepare you a sim card, tickets to the most popular attractions (with a line jump), and even some local souvenirs.

As always before you start any trip, try to learn a few words in the language, look into how long trips should take and the best routes and pre-book as much as possible.