The Future of Nursing Homes Must Adapt With Infection Control

Keeping infection under control in nursing homes has already proven itself a daunting task, but with Covid disrupting the industry it’s gotten much more challenging. Over half of the nurses in the U.S, the lifeblood of American nursing homes, report they feel undervalued, overwhelmed and stressed. High levels of stress can lead to forgetting basic hygienic practices like not washing hands. These conditions have made nurses leave their positions. Since January 2020, around 15 percent of nursing home workers have left, and more than half of nurses considered or intend to leave their positions, applying an even stronger strain on nursing homes

Nursing homes are struggling to stay open, with the average home running on a negative 4.9 percent profit margin. Without relief, a nursing home will usually shut down in 2 to 3 years. Many have already had to shut down and many more are on the brink of collapse. Although some action was taken to assist caregivers, it pales in comparison to the 15 million dollars of fines administered to nursing homes by CMS since the beginning of Covid.

Learn more about how Covid-19 has advanced the need for better infection control in the nursing home industry in the article below:

Infection Control: The Future of Skilled Nursing
Source: IPCWell.com